How To Use

Underglazes

Use the following steps to ensure a satisfactory result after the firing.

  1. Each bottle needs to be mixed thoroughly via shaking or stirring with a clean palette knife. Add brushing medium or water if paint appears too thick and difficult to mix.
  2. Squeeze the required amount onto a tile or paint palette. It is not recommended to continuously dip the brush into the paint container, as this may contaminate the colour.
  3. If necessary, stir in more brushing medium to achieve the desired consistency. The paint should flow from the brush and not stick to the bristles.

Application

Body

Chrysanthos Underglazes may be applied to greenware or bisque. Refer to the picture guide below on firing and glazing stages.

They may also be applied to mid fire and stoneware bodies and then glazed.

Finish

  • One coat creates a transparent finish, two coats a semi-transparent and three coats an opaque finish.
  • Apply coats one at a time, allowing each coat to dry. Ensure coats are not too thick.

Effects

  • Brush work/hand painting
  • Sponging
  • Splattering
  • Stippling
  • Airbrushing
  • Bubbling
  • Banding
  • Wash

Intermixable With

The colours can be applied with One Strokes and Café Colours on the same item or mixed. The glaze must be brushed on after.

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One Strokes

Use the following steps to ensure a satisfactory result after the firing.

  1. Each bottle needs to be mixed thoroughly via shaking or stirring with a clean palette knife. Add brushing medium or water if paint appears too thick and difficult to mix.
  2. Squeeze the required amount onto a tile or paint palette. It is not recommended to continuously dip the brush into the paint container, as this may contaminate the colour.
  3. If necessary, stir in more brushing medium to achieve the desired consistency. The paint should flow from the brush and not stick to the bristles.

Application

Body

Chrysanthos One Strokes may be applied to greenware or bisque. Refer to the picture guide below on firing and glazing stages.

They may also be applied to mid fire and stoneware bodies and then glazed.

Finish

  • One coat creates a transparent finish, two coats a semi-transparent and three coats an bright opaque finish.
  • Apply coats one at a time, allowing each coat to dry. Ensure coats are not too thick.
  • One Strokes are intended to be painted once hence the name ‘One Stroke’. They are ideal for any detail or brush design work with the finish being translucent.

Effects

  • Brush work/hand painting
  • Sponging
  • Splattering
  • Stippling
  • Airbrushing
  • Bubbling
  • Banding
  • Wash
  • Detailed Work
  • Majolica

Intermixable With

The colours can be applied with Underglazes and Café Colours on the same item or mixed. The glaze must be brushed on after.

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Cafe Colors

Cafe Colors are simple to use colours for bisque. Use the following steps to ensure a satisfactory result after the firing.

  1. Each bottle needs to be mixed thoroughly via shaking or stirring with a clean palette knife. Add brushing medium or water if paint appears too thick and difficult to mix.
  2. Squeeze the required amount onto a tile or paint palette. It is not recommended to continuously dip the brush into the paint container, as this may contaminate the colour.
  3. If necessary, stir in more brushing medium to achieve the desired consistency. The paint should flow from the brush and not stick to the bristles.

Application

Body

Café Colors and Cafe Colors (G) are for application to earthenware bisque. Café Colors H are for application to middle to high fire bisque.Refer to the picture guide below on firing and glazing stages.

Café Colors, once applied and dry can be glazed with clear brush on or dipping glazes, especially if used on functional ware.

Cafe Colors Gloss do not need to be clear glazed for decorative pieces or if piece is completely covered in CCG. They will fire gloss.

Finish

  • One coat creates a transparent finish, two coats a semi-transparent and three coats an bright opaque finish.
  • Apply coats one at a time, allowing each coat to dry. Ensure coats are not too thick.

Effects

  • Brush work/hand painting
  • Sponging
  • Splattering
  • Stippling
  • Airbrushing
  • Bubbling
  • Banding
  • Wash
  • Detailed Work
  • Majolica

Intermixable With

The colours can be applied with Underglazes and One Strokes on the same item or mixed. The piece must be clear glazed by dipping.

Greenware to Bisque, Paint Cafe Colors, Dip or Brush Clear Glaze, Fire to get Finished Ware

Superior Glazes

Superior Glazes are a low fire lead free glaze range. Use the following steps to ensure a satisfactory result after the firing.

  1. Each bottle needs to be mixed thoroughly via shaking or stirring with a clean palette knife. Add brushing medium or water if paint appears too thick and difficult to mix.
  2. Squeeze the required amount onto a tile or paint palette. It is not recommended to continuously dip the brush into the paint container, as this may contaminate the colour.
  3. If necessary, stir in more brushing medium to achieve the desired consistency. The paint should flow from the brush and not stick to the bristles.

Application

Body

Superior Glazes are for application to earthenware bisque. Refer to the picture guide below on firing.

Finish

  • Apply 2-3 coats one at a time, allowing each coat to dry. Ensure coats are not too thick.
  • The entire exterior of the ware must be glazed, including the base.
  • Each colour has a code (O, S, T) which signifies if it fires Opaque, Semi Transparent or Transparent.

If the inside of a piece needs to be coated with the Superior Glaze (Eg. A Vase), a “Roll Glazing” technique should be used.

Roll Glazing: In a separate container (120ml) pour approximately 3/4 of the product, filling the remaining container with water 3:1 ratio, and mix thoroughly. The product should appear like runny syrup not runny like milk.

Mix well and empty the entire contents of the container into the inside of the ware and roll the glaze around until the inside is totally covered. Pour the remaining contents back into the container, label and store away for future use or discard.

Immediately wipe away any spills or drips on the ware with a damp sponge. Turn item upside down and allow to drain and dry. It is recommended to Roll Glaze prior to painting the outside of the item.

Troubleshooting

Dull, hazy or dimpled surface
If after firing the surface of the ware appears hazy, dull or dimpled, then the glaze is too thick or the firing did not proceed correctly. Re-firing can sometimes improve the result.

Dry surface
If the item appears dry in patches or all over, then it is likely the item did not receive enough glaze. In this case, brush on more glaze over the dull areas and re-fire.

Glaze crawling
Glaze crawling (glaze contracts into pools on the surface exposing bare clay) is usually caused by contamination of the bisque during handling or firing too soon after dipping. Ensure hands are clean when decorating and handling bisque and that the pieces are allowed to dry before firing.

Crazing
Fine cracks appearing after firing. This can be due to the piece begin slightly under-fired, the bisque being under-fired or the glaze not being compatible with the clay body. If the crazing is minimal, re-firing the piece a cone or two higher (higher temperature) may resolve the problem.

Milky glaze
Commonly caused by an ‘under firing’. Kiln not reaching temperature or not soaking long enough during the firing, not allowing the glaze to even out and reach maturity which creates the more desirable clear glossy finish. Re-firing for a longer period of time, or soaking longer will resolve the problem.

Shelling or peeling
Caused from either a glaze incompatibility or incorrect cleaning of the item. Items can be ‘over cleaned’ creating an unfavorable polished surface or water saturating the surface; therefore the colour and glaze cannot fully adhere to the surface of the ware. This can also be an issue if the clay body is incompatible with the glaze.

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Fantasy Glazes

Fantasy Glazes are low fired lead free crystal effects glaze. Use the following steps to ensure a satisfactory result after the firing. These instructions apply to all of our Fantasy Glazes and Fantasy Crystals.

  1. Mix the contents of the container thoroughly with a palette knife. If the contents appear too thick and difficult to mix add a little brushing medium or water and stir again. Apply 3 coats allowing each coat to be almost dry before applying the next.
  2. Another method involves decanting the glaze into another container and not disturbing the crystals on the bottom. Stir the glaze with a palette knife and apply 2 generous coats onto the ware using a soft mop brush, allowing each coat to be almost dry before applying the next. For the final coat, decant the remainder of the glaze back in to the original container with the crystals and stir well. Then brush on the last coat with crystals in it, concentrating crystals on the areas you wish to have more ‘impact’.
  3. Allow the piece to dry before stilting and firing.

Application

Body

Fantasy Glazes are for application to earthenware or middle fire bisque.

Finish

  • It is very important to taper off approximately ‘2cm’ from the bottom of the ware when applying the third coat. Remove any crystals from this section as well and the bottom of the ware. This glaze is designed to ‘run’ dramatically during firing and therefore is likely to ‘stick’ to the kiln shelf if applied too thickly.
  • Fantasy Glazes may be applied to the ‘outside’ of wares intended for food but not recommended for application to the ‘inside’ of wares which come in contact with liquids or foods of any kind. Crystals have a tendency to craze making their use in food items undesirable.

Effects

Fantasy Enhancer may be added to the Fantasy Glazes sparingly (as indicated on the bottle) to enhance glaze flow and crystal formation. Care should be taken as too much may lead to a very runny glaze.

Troubleshooting

Crazing
It is normal for crystals in glazes to craze while cooling down and for perhaps days after begin removed from the kiln.

Blisters
If blisters appear on the surface of the ware, the ware should be re-fired and the problem will be resolved.

Dull, hazy or dimpled surface
If the surface finish of the piece appears hazy, white to bluish in colour and the surface resembles hundreds of little pores, the glaze has been applied too thick or the firing did not reach temperature or was not fired long enough. Re-firing will usually fix this problem.

Dry durface
If the item appears dry in patches or all over, then it is likely the item did not receive enough glaze. In this case, brush on more glaze over the dull areas and re-fire.

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Dipping Glazes

The preparation of any dipping glazes is critical to the result of the firing. A well-adjusted dipping glaze will result in few drip marks and a glossier patch free finish. These instructions apply to all our dipping glazes.

  1. Each bucket of glaze sold is filled to within 1.5 cm or .75 inch of the top rim of the bucket. Do not decant any glaze out of the bucket at this stage. The contents need to be mixed thoroughly first using an electric hand mixer for 5 or 6 minutes to ensure an even distribution of glaze material.
  2. Once the glaze has been mixed thoroughly (no glaze on the bottom of the bucket), a portion can be decanted into another bucket to allow room to dip items or for adjustment. To make it easier, the whole bucket should be decanted into a larger bucket for adjustment or dipping, ensuring there is no glaze material left in the bottom of the bucket.
  3. If necessary, the glaze may now be adjusted. To check, use a Dupont M50 viscosity cup (see notes below) and aim for a viscosity of 18 to 22 seconds. If the viscosity is too high (> 22 sec) add half a cup of distilled water and remix with the electric mixer for 2 or 3 minutes and retest the viscosity. Repeat this step until the glaze has the right viscosity.
  4. If the viscosity of the glaze is low (< 18 sec). Add in some of the glaze that has not been adjusted, remix and retest the viscosity. If there is no unadjusted glaze left, then let the glaze sit open for several hours or overnight to let water evaporate. Be sure to cover the bucket with something (paper towel) to prevent dust and dirt from getting in then repeat steps 3 to 4 again.
  5. Before dipping make sure that coloured glazes applied to bisqueware are thoroughly dry. Do not force dry coloured glazes by using heated air sources (hair dryer, heat lamp) as doing so may affect the performance of both the colour and clear glaze.
  6. For dipping, its a good idea to wear an apron, rubber gloves, safety glasses and shoe coverings. Spraying of the glaze is not recommended without adequate personal protection.
  7. To dip, use dipping tongs or latex gloves to hold the piece and immerse it completely using a smooth in and out motion. The piece only needs to be dipped for 1 to 2 seconds and only once.
  8. As soon as the piece is removed from the glaze, shake vigorously, and rotate allowing excess glaze to drip off. Use a fan brush moistened with dipping glaze to smooth out any stubborn drips and to touch up where the piece was held.
  9. While dipping, the glaze should be stirred every 15 to 20 minutes.

Side Notes

Viscosity cup

To use a viscosity cup, the glaze must first be stirred well. Once stirred, submerge the viscosity cup into the glaze and then lift out. As the bottom of the cup clears the top of the glaze, measure the time in seconds it takes for the stream to break coming out of the bottom of the viscosity cup. That time is the viscosity in seconds.

Large pieces

Dipping larger pieces is done in 2 steps. First half of the piece is dipped, then the other half is dipped overlapping slightly where the first dip finished. When the piece is dry, moisten a soft fan brush in the glaze and gently smooth over the seam line.

Hazy, white finish

If the fired finish of the piece is hazy, white to bluish in colour and the surface resembles hundreds of little pores, the glaze has been applied too thick or the firing did not reach temperature. The dipping procedure may need to be corrected or the firing may need to be checked as should be the kiln. Pieces that have this problem can be refired to attempt to fix the piece, but only when the source of the problem has been identified.